Friday, September 2, 2016

Happy Holiday

Due to the Labor Day weekend, there will be no lesson today. But start thinking of questions you may still have and let me know what you need. We are nearing the end of this class and I want to make sure you have everything to move forward.

16 comments:

  1. I am late getting started. I am fusing my fabric. I am getting "bubbles" in the fabric after fusing. What do I need to do to make the piece nice and smooth?

    ReplyDelete
  2. In the beginning of the lesson on Composition and Design, you said: "This is where the lesson plan all falls apart." My question is "What else had you planned to teach us?" Although I am still catching up with the excellent composition and optical illusion lessons, I'm sure other participants besides me are wishing NOT to be nearing the end. Bless you for doing this.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Elizabeth, press the Wonder-Under on top of the fabric.
    Don't use steam. When you peel off the paper (after the fabric is cool) the bubbles may release the fusible, but usually they are small and insignificant. This happens to the best of us so don't worry.

    Maryl, when I wrote that line it was because the discussion about design is a tricky one, and I didn't want to pontificate and narrow anyone's horizons, or ideas, or imagination. At the point of understanding how to fuse a design or make one up for yourself, there is nothing really preventing you from moving forward on your own. I am sure you don't want to keep doing simple homework assignments and want to break out and do your designs. That is my goal, to prepare you to be able to keep going forward.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Re: bubbles in fusible. I've had this problem, too, even though I've followed Melody's directions and tips, but still the bubbles were not insignificant. The only remedy I have found, also Melody's suggestion, is to carefully remove the webbing from the paper and fuse it to the fabric upon a teflon pressing sheet, pressing from the right side of the fabric. Yes, it takes MUCH longer, but once thoroughly cooled and peeled off the pressing sheet, it is completely fused, with an even shinier and seemingly thicker application of webbing. I can't imagine that more fusers haven't had this problem, too. For me it was/is a biggie.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the tips, Melody and Nancy. Will give it a try. I was pressing with my fabric on top.

      Delete
  4. Oh, no! I've kept up and am quilting my third piece. I've so enjoyed the lessons and don't want them to end! I seem to work better when I have group motivation. I would love to see a final "challenge" using everything we've learned in a fairly large size like 24" x 36" or whatever. I haven't used any of my solids because I look at my Vicki Welsh fabrics and just can't not use them so need to start. I keep looking at "Full Sails". The design is just so good and your quilting is amazing. I'm hoping to come up with a design that showcases the fabrics like that piece does. Anyway, I would love one more (or more) assignment so I keep at it!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh and one specific question about quilting. In the finishing lesson, Melody, you did all the quilting then covered up the back (which speaks to me--ha ha), but in the composition lesson piece, you said you would do any hand quilting with just the batting and then machine quilt after the backing is sewn on. Was there a reason why you chose a different quilting order for the two pieces? (I know it may just be "no rules," but is there a specific "why" in the actual thought process to either decision, please?). Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Melody, in the beginning you said this would be a long term thing. Is it not as rewarding as you hoped?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Susan,
    I love to hear that you are ready for a new challenge, but like so many art teachers before me, this signals a beginning of gathering your own ideas. The lessons will end because you already have what you need and now it is up to you to move forward. This is a GOOD THING.
    So think about what you have seen that inspires you (from other art and artists) and consider what approach you will take. Of course you will make it your own. That's the challenge we all face.
    Maryl, In both cases I am doing the quilting and hand stitching first without the backing fabric, which I will stress is ONLY FOR SMALL WORKS.
    For larger quilts I would do the Escape Hatch finish and then quilt through all three layers.
    In all situations, the most important thing to consider is the finished product and what will make it look the best. The art is on the front but the back can noticed by some people. It's totally up to you.
    Donaleen, this has been totally rewarding but it has its limits as far as what I can teach you (everyone). I cannot teach how to pull art out of yourself, which is a significant part of being an art quilter. I would say that becoming an artist means making the work, and making it as often as possible. Developing a routine where there are hours where you allow yourself to play and discover how to build, create, dissect and start over.
    The great thing about fusing is that you can do anything you want, without worrying about construction techniques. I will say more about that this Friday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How long will the class last?
      My goal is to have a group of committed fusers who will continue to make art along with me for a long time. Eventually you will all be famous and I will say I knew you when...ha!

      Delete
  8. I have a couple of questions about fusing technique, please:
    1. sometimes when I fuse it looks like the paper becomes more translucent and the color of the fabric shows through better. Other times not. I haven't fused enough fabric yet to tell if this translucent look indicates a better fuse or if it might mean too much heat and heading toward scorching the adhesive. Have you noticed this? Or are there other visual cues to know when the adhesive is well fused? I fairly often have spots where the paper doesn't release well on the first try. I figure that I must not be heating enough but fear overheating.

    2. When you roll fused fabrics to store them, do you layer release paper between? Do you ever have problems with adhesive sticking to the next fabric when stored?

    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Christine, yes the paper does show translucence when the fusible has transferred from the paper to the fabric. With experience this will become more obvious. If the paper curls or stiffens, then you are over heating it. It takes quite a lot of pressing to make that happen.
    The fusible is not sticky and never sticks unless heated, so rolling the fabric causes no problems. And rolled fabric stays smooth when store this way. No paper is needed.

    ReplyDelete
  10. How long will the class last?
    My goal is to have a group of committed fusers who will continue to make art along with me for a long time. Eventually you will all be famous and I will say I knew you when...ha!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Please email your class schedule to me. dramamama1961@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete

Comment or ask your questions here so I can clear up any confusion.